Monday, 19 February 2018

The Making of: Red Heart Embed Soap



Next up in our Valentine's themed tutorials are these red heart embedded soap bars. They are both fun to make and use. Here's what you will need:

Ingredients

- Clear Melt & Pour Base 250g
- Goat Milk Melt & Pour Base 250g
Strawberry Fragrance oil 20ml
Red liquid dye
- Alcohol (in spray bottle)

Safety warning: Hot soap bases will hurt if they come in contact with the skin so do be careful when handling.
All equipment & ingredients available in our webstore: www.shopsoapetal.com. Click on each item for a direct link to that item in our webstore.


Equipment

Scale
- 6x Heart moulds (crinkled)
- Pyrex jug
- Thermometer
- Heat source (Microwave)
Pipettes (2)
- Mixing spoon (plastic/stainless steel)
- Soap cutter
- Recycled chocolate box or silicone loaf mould

Optional:
- Shrink wraps (for packaging)
- Gloves
- Cutting board

All equipment & ingredients available in our webstore: www.shopsoapetal.com. Click on each item for a direct link to that item in our webstore.


Method

Tip: Set out everything you will need so you don't have to go running about after you've begun. 
1. Weigh out all your ingredients.
2. Cut clear Melt and Pour soap base into small, even sizes and put into the pyrex jug.


3. Melt in the microwave in 30 second bursts. (It should be fully melted by the 3-minute mark). Make sure to stir after every minute. Note: I always suggest using a microwave for melting soap bases to avoid scalding the base but if you do not have one available you can use a cooker and a double boiler. You will have to closely monitor the temperature with a thermometer to make sure it does not get too hot. 
4. Using a pipette, add the red dye to the melted soap base to create a deep red colour.
5. Using a pipette, add 10ml fragrance oil to the melted soap base. Mix thoroughly.
6. Spritz the heart moulds with some rubbing alcohol and pour the soap base in. It should fill up 4 moulds.
7. Spray the tops with rubbing alcohol to eliminate bubbles and allow to set. It should take about 30 minutes. Unmould and set aside.
8. Cut Goat Milk Melt and Pour soap base into small, even sizes and put into the pyrex jug.
9. Melt in the microwave in 30 second bursts. (It should be fully melted by the 3-minute mark). Make sure to stir after every minute.
10. Using a pipette, add 10ml fragrance oil to the melted soap base. Mix thoroughly.
11. Arrange the red hearts created in steps 1-7 into the recycled chocolate box. Put them upside down for balance - then pour the goat milk soap base over and around them.



12. Spray the top with rubbing alcohol and allow to set (another 30 minutes).
13. Unmould the soap once set and cut into preferred sizes using a sharp knife or soap cutter.






You can watch the making video for this red heart embed soap on our channel.


Download the recipe card for this tutorial here: FREE RECIPE CARD!



Don't have some of the ingredients or equipment, don't worry we've got you covered. Visit our webstore to order all you need and we will deliver right to your door step!

Don't forget to tag us on your creations on Instagram or Facebook. We will love to see your creations.


Love,


Soap et al. - Your one stop handcraft supply store
We supply, you create! Ingredients by us, handmade by you!

Sunday, 4 February 2018

The Making of: Rose Bath Bombs


I have been thinking about roses a lot these last few days; it is the season for them after all! So it was no surprise to The Team when I wanted to include these rose bath bombs to our Valentine's themed tutorials. I have used a couple of these myself and I have to tell you, I DID NOT want to leave the bathtub + the bathroom smelled amazing hours after. They are both fun to make and use. Here's what you will need:


Ingredients

- Baking Soda 1000g
- Citric Acid 500g
- Tapioca Powder 50g
- Light oil of choice (Sweet Almond, Grape seed or Sunflower) 120g
- Strawberry Fragrance oil 10ml
- French Rose Fragrance oil 20ml
- Rose Petals 5g
- Red liquid dye
- Pink glitter (microfine)
- Witch Hazel

All equipment & ingredients are available in our webstore: www.shopsoapetal.com. Click on each item for a direct link to that item in the webstore.

Equipment

- Metal bath bomb mould (6cm)
- Scale
- Large mixing bowls (2)
- Fine mesh sieve
- Pipettes (2)
- Whisk

Optional:
- Paint brush (for sprinkling glitter)
- Shrink wraps (for packaging)

All equipment & ingredients are available in our webstore: www.shopsoapetal.com. Click on each item for a direct link to that item in the webstore.


Method

Tip: Set out everything you will need so you don't have to go running about after you've begun.


  • 1. Weigh out all your ingredients.




  • 2. Sieve all the powders and dry ingredients into one of your mixing bowls.
  • 3. Divide the powders equally between the two mixing bowls.
  • 4. Weight out your oil of choice (I used Sunflower oil) and split it equally between the two bowls.



  • 5. Add drops of the red dye to one of the mixing bowls to create a light pink colour.
  • 6. Split the fragrance oil equally between the two bowls.
  • 7. Spritz the bowls with witch hazel to create a mouldable consistency.
  • 8. Sprinkle some rose petals into one of the bath bomb moulds.
  • 9. Fill both halves of the bath bomb mould with your mix and hold the two halves together for about 5 - 10 seconds.
  • 10. Use a metal spoon (or the end of your whisk) to gently tap the bath bomb mould to release the bath bomb.
  • 11. Open the mould and place your newly created bath bomb on a tray or soft surface where it can remain undisturbed until it is completely dry.
  • 12. Repeat steps 8 to 11 until all your mix has been used up.
  • 13. Use the paint brush to sprinkle some glitter over the tops of the bath bombs for some sparkle.



You can watch the making video for these rose bath bombs below and on our channel:  SoapetalTV.



Download the recipe card for this tutorial here: FREE RECIPE CARD!

I accidentally dropped one of the bath bombs during the shoot because The Team wouldn't stop cracking me up. If you have an oppsie-daisy just like this one, you can save it by using it as a bath fizzy which is just like a bath bomb without the round shape. :)



Don't have some of the ingredients or equipment, don't worry we've got you covered. Visit our webstore to order all you need and we will deliver right to your door step!


Don't forget to tag us on your creations on Instagram or Facebook. We will love to see your creations.


Love,


Soap et al. - Your one stop handcraft supply store
We supply, you create! Ingredients by us, handmade by you!

Wednesday, 17 January 2018

Soap this, Soap that: Pigment clumping

Now I like colour pigments (oxides, ultramarines etc.) as much as the next soaper. They give good strong colours, they don't bleed and they don't fade either. But they do tend to clump. A LOT! Just look what it did to this soap below.

A classic example of oxide clumping can be seen in this first batch of this "Avocado, Cucumber & Lime" soap.

 So here are a few tips on how to avoid pigment clumping in CP soap making.
  1.  ALWAYS premix your colours in a little oil before adding to soap batter. 1 teaspoon oxide in 2 tablespoons *oil for every 500 grams soap is a good starting point. You can use less for a lighter shade, but a teaspoon should give you a strong, solid colour.
  2. Mix vigorously or use a mini mixer. (I use a mini  frother and it works very well!).
  3. Premix colour right before you have use them, otherwise mix again to incorporate particles that may have settled.
  4. When adding purees or juices (as was in my case), DO NOT add both colour and additive at the same time. Mix in puree/juice first, blend, then add your premixed colours, otherwise what happens when you add both together is that the water-based additive will affect your oxide and cause it to clump irrespective of whether you premixed it or not.

*Titanium Dioxide comes in two forms: Water dispersible and Oil dispersible. Premix in appropriate base.
**Also, while premixing oxides in oil is best, ultramarines prefer water.

And that's that! If you don't mind the clumping then you needn't worry about all this. Otherwise a little extra effort goes a long way. :)

Happy Soaping!

Love,

Wednesday, 10 January 2018

Soap this, Soap that: Using botanicals in soap



When adding any natural herbs, leaves, flowers, any botanicals really to soap, there is one thing you should keep in mind and that is: IT WILL TURN BROWN OVER TIME.

Not very attractive, is it?
An example of botanicals browning in Cold Process soap.

This rule is not specific to Cold Process (CP) soaps only. In the title picture used for this segment, I used dried whole rose buds in a CP/MP soap. The rose buds were added to the MP (Melt and Pour) part and admittedly did go a while before turning brown but it eventually did. I attributed this to the MP sweating (remember glycerine sweat from here) and inadvertently "wetting" the rose buds, introducing moisture and hence the browning.

As with all things, it is a matter of choice so if you don't mind the browning at all then go ahead, but if you do, here are some tips:

1. Consider an infusion - If what you want is to add the properties of the flower/herb to your soap then an infusion would work just as well without the browning effect.

2. If you still want to add some of the actual herb/flower/leaves, consider grinding it and sprinkling only a little on top of the soap and only after unmoulding - it will still turn brown but not as much. (note that this will not work for rose buds as they will need to stick to the soap while it is still soft).

3. Do not spray botanicals with rubbing alcohol - this will only accelerate the browning process in my opinion. Spray the top of your soaps and then add the botanicals.

4. Consider flower buds, rather than petals. (I find they work better for me. I leave the petals for bath salts and bombs).

5. Use Calendula (for some reason they don't brown in soap at all).

I hope this helps.
Happy Soaping,

Love,